Excretion of the Principal Urinary Metabolites of Phenytoin and Absolute Oral Bioavailability Determined by Use of a Stable Isotope in Patients with Epilepsy

The anticonvulsant properties of phenytoin (PHT) were discovered in 1938. Since then, it has been one of the most widely used antiepileptic drugs. It is slowly absorbed, extensively plasma protein-bound, exhibits a nonlinear, concentration-dependent pharmacokinetic profile, and has a narrow therapeutic range. We determined PHT bioavailability during steady-state therapy by 1) measurement of the two … Continued

Poor Correlation between Urinary Excretion of the Principal Urinary Metabolites of Phenytoin and Absolute Oral Bioavailability Determined by a Stable Isotope Method in Epilepsy Patients

The anticonvulsant properties of phenytoin (PHT) were discovered in 1938. Since then, it has been one of the most widely used antiepileptic drugs. It is slowly absorbed, extensively plasma protein-bound, exhibits a nonlinear, concentration-dependent pharmacokinetic profile, and has a narrow therapeutic range. We determined PHT bioavailability during steady-state therapy by 1) measurement of the two … Continued

Pharmacokinetic Analysis of Capsaicin After Topical Administration of a High-concentration Capsaicin Patch to Patients With Peripheral Neuropathic Pain

Capsaicin, a pungent compound in chili peppers, is a highly selective agonist for the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor expressed in nociceptive sensory nerves. A high-concentration (640 μg/cm2) capsaicin patch, designated NGX-4010, is in clinical evaluation for the management of peripheral neuropathic pain. To determine systemic capsaicin exposure after single 60- or 90-minute NGX-4010 … Continued

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